Feet, Physiotherapy, Stability

The foot – an amazing piece of machinery !

Happy feetWe stand, run, jump, hop & dance, all on our feet and rarely give them any thought until we feel pain or feel unsteady!

Our feet are the basis of our posture and give us most of the feedback we need to balance!

Bones of the footSo as upright animals we rely totally upon our feet, yet there they are, down there, out of sight, out of mind while many, many small muscles do their stabilising jobs.

But have you ever thought what’s involved in simply standing on your feet?

Here’s a simple exercise to highlight just one of the stabilising muscles.  Give this a try.

Stand with feet hip width apart.

Two feetTry to stretch you toes out straight and lean slightly forward so the tips of your toes have a small amount of weight on them but you haven’t lifted the heel.

Can you feel the muscles in the sole working? These are the muscles designed to support our arches and I bet this is the first time you’ve been aware of them !

But then our world is mostly flat and safe and we have no need to be in a position of preparation for change and as a result our feet get really lazy.

I like to think of our feet having a TRIPOD OF STABILITY.

  • The tip of the big toe
  • The base of the little toe and
  • The heel

Try standing with weight evenly distributed between these three points and you will unwittingly turn on a whole range of muscles in your foot, thigh, buttock and back.

Bare feet in grassStrong feet – the basis of good posture – a basis of good health.

Post by Catherine Stephens B. App Sc (Physio) MAPA.

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Improving Movement, Physiotherapy, Stability

5 exercises to keep your shoulder stable and healthy

The key to a healthy, pain free and strong shoulder is a stable scapula (or shoulder blade) which is the base from which all shoulder movement occurs. It is the bone where the “socket” of your shoulder is found and to which the “ball” of your upper arm (humerus) connects.

Losing scapula stability is often the first step toward developing painful injuries such as rotator cuff tears, subacromial bursitis and arthritis.

The following exercises are very effective for improving scapula stability and therefore improving shoulder function. Please keep in mind that you should never have pain during or after doing these exercises. If you do, please consult a physiotherapist before continuing.

scapulaScapula Clock#1.Scapula clock: Stand close to a wall with your elbow bent. Place your hand on a small ball on the wall just below shoulder height. Roll your shoulder blade back and down and hold it set in this position.

Make circles alternating from clockwise to counterclockwise with your hand on the ball while maintaining your shoulder set. Repeat 10 times each way.

Pull Downs#2. Pull downs: Using a cable or theratube secured above you.

Pull down with straight arms to the side of body and simultaneously draw your shoulder blades back and down to feel muscular squeeze in the middle part of your back just below the shoulder blades.

Repeat 10-20 times.

Wall Push Ups#3. Wall push ups: Place hands on wall below shoulder height and slightly wider than shoulder width.

Stand with feet together and away from wall so you are weight bearing through your arms and hands.

Do slow push ups on the wall being mindful to keep the shoulders back and down as you press toward wall.

As you press away from the wall roll the shoulder blades around the ribcage to arch the upper spine.  Repeat 10 times.

4 Point Kneeling#4. Four point kneeling: Assume four point kneeling position.

Take weight forward so your nose is in front of your fingertips. Bend elbows and take shoulders down away from your ears.

Keep shoulders back and down and maintain stability on one arm as you lift the other out in front.  Repeat on the other side and do 5-10 repetitions.

Ball Roll#5. Roll out on ball: Assume start position as pictured.

Ensure shoulders, hips and knees are aligned and support weight on hands.

Slowly roll the ball out in front of you, keeping your body aligned and extend the arms away from the body to allow the elbows and forearms to rest on the ball.

Maintain shoulder blades down and back. Repeat 10 times.

Post by Angus Tadman