Achilles, Daily Exercises, Feet, Injuries, Lifestyle, Physiotherapy, Sports, Stretching

The “Achilles Heel” of runners!! 5 tips to help remedy Achilles tendon pain.

Whether you are a professional marathon runner or simply enjoy a recreational jog it is likely that you have experienced pain in the Achilles tendon at some point. The pain will generally be most prominent during warm-up, settle down significantly as you run only to return with a vengeance after you have cooled down after running! If it continues to worsen, it can become very debilitating and prevent from running altogether!

This article will help to arm you with the anatomical information and practical knowledge necessary to help recognise Achilles tendon pain and how to manage it!

Firstly, it is important that you know the anatomy of your Achilles!

Achilles tendonThe Achilles tendon joins the calf muscle to the heel bone. Tendons are a soft tissue structure made up of the elastic material called collagen and always attach muscles to bone. The role of the Achilles tendon is to transfer the power produced by your calf muscles through to the heel bone to move the ankle joint and provide you with forwards thrust as you run.

Pain in this area can be as a result of tendonitis (inflammation of the tendon) or tearing. It can sometimes start very suddenly after a big load through the tendon, such as falling into a pothole as you run. More commonly, pain in the Achilles develops a gradually over time as a result of overuse and worsens unless managed appropriately.

Things that can predispose you to Achilles tendon pain are:

  • Poor foot mechanics (corrective orthotics or well prescribed sports shoes can help enormously)
  • Stiffness of the ankle joints (this can occur after an acute ankle injury such as a rolled ankle)
  • A significant and sudden increase in training load (such as further distance, increased regularity, or extra hills etc.)
  • Weakness of the hip or core muscles

To remedy the situation there are 5 simple things that you can do:

  1. Stretching may aggravate the tendon! Avoid dropping your heel off a step or doing strong calf stretching as this is too aggressive for a sore or damaged tendongastrocnemius-stretch-stairs
  2. Mobilising the sciatic nerve system before rising from bed can help with morning stiffnessHamstringAnim2
  3. Avoid high impact exercises like jumping, skipping, running (especially soft sand running!)Skipping
  4. A small heel raise can help alleviate pain and overstretching in the short term (put one in both shoes!)heel lift illustrated  copy
  5. Get some professional advice from a physiotherapist. There are a number of important exercises that can be done to improve your tendon pain and get you back to running ASAP!!

 

Post by Angus Tadman (B.App.Sc Phty Hons I) and Catherine Stephens (B.App.Sc Phty)

abdominals, back, Core stability, Daily Exercises, Gymn Dangers, Hips, Improving Movement, Injuries, Physio's Personal Tips, Physiotherapy, Pilates, Stability

How stable is your core?? Here’s how to check!

personaltrainerOften, people spend hours doing “core training” in the gym such as sit-ups, planks and the like only to find that they still experience symptoms of instability such as low back pain during training or, they get injured regularly doing exercise. The problem? This kind of “core training” addresses the strength of your abdominal and oblique muscles which are responsible for providing movement but does not train the deeper, stabilising muscles that are responsible for maintaining good alignment of the spine.

Here is a little exercise to introduce the feeling and the essence of stability in you torso. The true “core”:

1. Lie on your back, knees up, feet flat on the ground.

2. Breath, and feel how your ribs move and the shape of your spine changes.

3. Place your index fingers on the bones at the top of your pelvis at the front.

4. Feel what happens when you lift one foot from the floor REALLY SLOWLY!!! No jumping it up!!!

5. Try again and try to not allow any movement in your pelvis or lumbar spine.

Did you hold your breath? Did your pelvis roll toward the side you lifted? Did your back arch away from the floor? Did you get a “ping” of back  pain?

If YES was an answer to any of these questions you have room for improvement in you core stabilisation.

Practicing this exercise is actually a great way to begin the reactivation of your deeper, stabilising muscles.  Breathing as you move and load the spine is essential to prevent rigidity. Our bodies are designed to be fluid and coordinated when moving and breath holding can stifle this and cause us to become to stiff when moving! If you don’t breath while you do anything you won’t do it for very long!!

Mullumbimby-Pilates

For detailed explanation of core stability refer to our previous blog “What is core stability?”. You can find it here: https://northernbeachesphysio.com/2014/03/28/what-is-core-stability/.

Also, watch this video of one of physiotherapists, Angus, walking through the above exercise and explaining how to activate your core!

abdominals, Balance, Core stability, Daily Exercises, Hips, Injuries, Lifestyle, Physio's Personal Tips, Physiotherapy, Skiing, Sports, Stability

Skiing injury prevention program!

If you are a budding skier then you have probably experienced the frustration of getting injured early in a skiing holiday and missing out on enjoying the rest of your time at the snow. After all that expense, the last thing you need is to be injured!!

The following series of informational videos provides a step by step exercise program designed to improve your skiing specific strength, power and stability. Most importantly, the following exercises will not only help to prevent injury, but will maximise your performance on skis!

Please enjoy the following exercises and always practice caution when learning something new! We’d love to hear how you managed with the program so please, comment below!

 

 

 

 

 

Post by Catherine Stephens (B.App.Sc – Physiotherapy)

Physiotherapy

End stage ankle rehabilitation – reduce your risk of re-injury!

Ankle injury

Ankle “inversion” injuries or “rolled ankles” are one of the most common sporting injuries.

Unfortunately, people who experience this injury often return to sport too soon without completing an appropriate rehabilitation program, only to re-injure themselves.

The following video demonstrates some important exercises that will allow you to maximise your ankle rehabilitation and dramatically reduce the chances of re-injury!

 

 

Post by Catherine Stephens (B.App.Sc – Physiotherapy)

abdominals, back, Core stability, Feet, Gymn Dangers, Physiotherapy, Pilates, Shoulder

What is Core Stability?

Power and Strength are useless without Stability and Control

muscles

Big flashy muscles might be attractive but as any physio will tell you, they are next to useless without core stability.

Thankfully the health and fitness industry has now started to embrace the need for core stability, but still few people really understand the concept and what it means.

Essentially our bodies have hundreds of different muscles that all perform important tasks and the very conspicuous Abs, Glutes, Pecs, Delts and Biceps (amongst others) are there to provide strength but they are supported by a plethora of smaller, less conspicuous muscles that provide stability.

shock absorbersThese are generically referred to as the ‘Core Muscles’ and the best comparison we can think of is with automotive suspension systems.

If the ‘Strength’ muscles are the springs then the ‘Core’ muscles would be the shock absorbers.  They are usually less conspicuous, sometimes even hidden within the springs but without them your car would fall apart in no time.

The same goes for humans.  Good strength muscles alone won’t keep you running smoothly. Without good core stability you’ll be in for lube and servicing (physio) all too often and eventually you’ll be off to the scrap yard before your time!

inner_core_musclesWhen it comes to spinal stability, the most important muscles are the multifidus, pelvic floor and transversus abdominis. As shown in the image to the right, these muscles form a supportive cylinder around the spine. The transversus abdominis is like a corset around your abdomen and it sits deep underneath all the “six-pack” muscles.  It attaches the lower ribs, diaphragm and lumbar spine to the pelvis.

This ‘core’ stabilises the spine and allows the load of movement to be evenly distributed between all the intricate joints of the spine. Just like a car suspension system, it reduces the shock through the joints and thus reduces wear and tear which would, over time, lead to conditions such as arthritis or bulging discs.

personaltrainerDoing exercises like sit ups is useful to strengthen the big “six-pack” muscles, but doing this exercise without good core stability will lead to excessive load through the joints of the spine and can lead to injury of the spine.

So in that respect it is important to activate and strengthen the core before you start on a regime of strength building.

 

Muscles of the posterior shoulderAnother example is the shoulder. The “delts”, “lats”, “pecs” and “biceps” look fabulous but they are not the stabilisers of the shoulder.

Over training of these without attention to the deeper, core stabilisers of the shoulder can result in injury as a result of an increased load being put through the system without the appropriate “suspension”, so to speak.

See our blog on ‘Shoulder Stability’ for a series of simple exercises to build core shoulder stability.

Each area of the body  has a “core” component.

Feet have intrinsic muscles that operate in balancing.

Ankles rely on hip and foot stabilisers for control.

Knees similarly need good hips and feet to be protected.

and even Necks have a deep system of muscles that control movement.

In essence, the core muscles play a crucial a role in overall well being and strength. Without the stability and control provided by the deeper core muscles, the power and strength gained from training is useless!!

Stay tuned as our series of CORE STABILITY blogs will introduce the specifics of core training for different parts of the body and the common areas of overloading we see in fitness regimes!

Post by Catherine Stephens (B.App.Sc Physio) and Angus Tadman (B.App.Sc Physio Hons I)

Alarm Clock
Daily Exercises, Gluteal, Improving Movement, Injuries, Lifestyle, Physio's Personal Tips, Physiotherapy

Morning stretches!

Stretches in the morning:

Spinal stiffness and pain is a common complaint. This can be caused by inflammation, arthritis or muscular tightness as well as injuries such as bulging discs.

The impact of spinal symptoms can easily be reduced by doing a regular morning stretching session.

Generally, I advise my patients to wait 20-30 minutes after rising from bed before they commence spinal stretching. This is to allow the discs to compress slightly after they have been expanding during sleep. This reduces the risk of injury to the discs.

Following is a list of great exercises to do in the morning to get your spine moving!

Knees to chest rocking: bring the knees to the chest and tuck up in a gentle rocking motion 10 times.

CurlRock

Sciatic nerve stretches: using a long belt stretch the leg as shown by gently moving the ankle forward and back, keeping the leg straight.

HamstringAnim2

Piriformis and gluteal stretches: place the ankle of one leg on the knee of the other and lift both legs up toward you as shown, hold for 20-30 seconds as you pull the stretching leg toward the opposite shoulder and push into the ankle with the opposite knee.

GluteStretch

Open book stretch: lying on your side as shown, breathe in as you take your top arm across your body, allowing your head and shoulders to turn with it. Hold the stretch and breathe out. Repeat 10 times both sides.

Thoracic Open Book stretch

Improving Movement, Physiotherapy, Sports, Stretching

Best hamstring stretching technique

If you spend a lot of time at a desk or do a lot of physical activity such as running and cycling then it is likely that you will have tightness in your hamstrings. Tightness in the hamstring muscle group can lead to knee pain, back pain and can increase the risk of tearing the hamstrings during activity.

To effectively isolate and stretch the hamstring muscle group it is crucial that your technique is right. There are a number of different “hamstring stretches” out there but the following video outlines the best way to get a strong isolated stretch into the hamstrings!

Let us know your reactions to our blogs – we’d love to hear from you, critiques, queries, compliments all gratefully accepted.

Post by Angus Tadman B. App. Sc (Phty) Hons Class I

abdominals, Balance, Core stability, Daily Exercises, Physiotherapy, Shoulder, Stability

Swiss Ball for Stability – video-blog

Hello and welcome to our first video blog.

Its all about core stability, pelvic stability and balance – all three very important to maintaining a healthy balance within yourself.

Here’s Angus to demonstrate the exercise.

If you haven’t got a Swiss Ball at home then we highly recommend you get one – they are an extremely versatile aid to keeping yourself in-trim at home and to top it all they are great fun to use too.   We’ll have plenty more demonstrations of exercises you can do with a Swiss Ball soon.

We have them in stock in the shop so ask at reception. Here’s the page that lists all our supplies:- https://northernbeachesphysio.com/supplies/

We’re aiming to make a lot more video clips over the course of this year which will be hosted on our Northern Beaches Physio channel on YouTube.

Here’s a link:-  http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNCRpch8eeN3bPCH4oaAPFQ

Stay tuned !

So, how are we doing?  Did Angus do well? (and no, channel seven, you can’t have him).  Do you like our blogs?  What would you like to see more of?  Use the ‘Reply’ field below to have your say, we’d love to hear from you.

Post by Catherine Stephens B. App Sc (Physio) MAPA.

Gluteal, Hips, Improving Movement, Physiotherapy, Stability

Happy Hips

Whether you are a walker, a runner, footballer or even a belly-dancer, everyone needs good hip stability to be able to perform their sport (or their art) with optimum control.

Belly Dancers Hips

Poor stability around the hip joint can lead to problems such as trochanteric bursitis, lower back pain, sciatic pain and groin injuries. If you have one of these problems it is possible that you have weakness and poor control of the deep muscles of your hip joint.

Hip stability is achieved by having not only strength of the big gluteal muscles that make up the bulk of your buttocks but also good timing of activation and control of the deeper muscles of the hip joint. These deep muscles are responsible for stabilising the hip joint during movement to allow the larger gluteal muscles to move your hip with better joint alignment.

Hips Start

Knees bent, pelvis tilted

To test your deep hip stability simply follow these steps:

1) Stand in front of a mirror with your knees slightly bent (around 30 degrees) and your pelvis tilted forwards.

Now place your hands on your hips to feel the muscles just behind your hip with your thumbs and your abdomen with fingertips.

Hip exercise

Hips always level

2) Gently transfer your weight to one side, aiming to keep your knee, hip and shoulder aligned on the side that you are leaning toward e.g. your hips stay level with the ground.

Hold for a few seconds then transfer your weight to the other foot, again keeping your hips level.

If you have good stability you should be able to do this and maintain alignment of your hips, knees and shoulders, as shown in the animated image on the left, and you will feel the muscles activate strongly.

If you have poor stability you will find it hard to keep your balance and you may see your hips drop or your shoulders sway too far out to the side, as shown below.

Happy Hips Wrong

Left – hips crooked, Centre starting position. Right – hips crooked

Practicing this simple movement daily can help to improve the stability of your hip joint.

Keep it up! Remember; stable hips are happy hips!

Post by Angus Tadman B. App. Sc (Phty) Hons Class I

Daily Exercises, Improving Movement, Physiotherapy, Stretching

Avoid the Hump – the stiff thoracic spine

Do you spend hours bent over a workstation? Does your job involve repetitive bending and heavy lifting? Do you, like so many of us in recent years, use a tablet, smart phone or laptop computer for hours every day?

Thoracic HumpIf you answered yes to any of the above then it is very likely that you will have developed stiffness in your upper back.  This ‘thoracic region’ is the largest part of our spine.  It starts at the base of your neck and ends just above the lower back.

As a result of daily habits, like those described above, and poor posture, the thoracic spine is more likely to become stiff.   This may not present as a major problem initially but it can have flow-on effects to the lower back, neck and shoulders.

The most immediate obvious effect of thoracic stiffness is in an increase in the natural curvature of your upper back and causes you to stand with “rounded shoulders”. This poor posture that we so often adopt as a result of laziness of our muscles eventually becomes permanent as the joints lose their ability to move back into a more upright position!

There are two wonderfully effective stretches that can help to increase thoracic spine mobility:

1)    The open book stretch: Lay on your side as shown. Breathe in as you move your top arm across your body and turn your head and shoulders with it, keeping your knee firmly placed on the floor. Breathe out as you hold the stretch for around ten to fifteen seconds, then return to the start and repeat 10 times.

Thoracic Open Book stretch

2)    Extension over ball: Place a small inflatable ball on the floor – an exercise ball is best as it is quite squishy but a soft soccer ball will also do. Lay over the ball positioned between your shoulder blades. Make sure your head is supported on a pillow or a rolled up towel and your legs are bent. Stretch for 2 minutes with your arms overhead, breathing fully and relaxing into the stretch.

Lay over ball

Post by Angus Tadman B. App. Sc (Phty) Hons Class I

abdominals, Gymn Dangers, Physiotherapy, Pilates, Shoulder, Stability

Strong is the new SEXY

Strong is the new sexy but you have to be stable to be strong

Fit Woman

The media image of gorgeous and sexy has changed in recent years. It seems the willowy overly thin or the voluptuous curvy image of attractive woman has been surpassed with healthy strong and muscular women like Michelle Bridges or Anglina Jolie as Lara Croft. Men with muscles and great posture have always been the most admired and now the girls are aiming for the same.

In endeavouring to achieve this end it is essential to increase core strength and stability as we build power. A failure to address the “stability” part of “strong” will leave the body at risk of injury. Building muscle bulk is quite possible without core strength but pain might build to and there is nothing sexy about being injured or in pain!

We see increasing episodes at the clinic of back pain, tendon injuries and knee injuries in the strong but unstable individual who has been focusing purely on developing power and a good looking pysique.

Cross TrainerSome gym machines provide so much control of movement there is no challenge to stability, resulting in increasing strength but without the protection offered by the co-activation of stabilising muscle systems throughout the body.

Holding onto the handles of the cross trainer has the machine providing control of movement direction, minimising how much stability you have to provide from within.   Using the cross trainer not holding the handles ensures YOU have to provide the stability and control to maintain smooth movement.

Try it and feel the difference…. carefully at first!!  It is a much harder workout – and thats the acid test.  If its easy its not doing you as much good.

BOSU

Incorporating free weights and weight bearing exercise on unstable platforms like a BOSU will have you protecting the joints while building strength.

We know that good control and correct activation of the deeper abdominals flatten the tummy. Without this the rectus abdominus  (the six pack muscle) can strengthen but the abdomen can remain distended.  We often see very strong men with big bellys… a result of poor training technique.

Strengthening the deeper muscles around the shoulder girdle gives improved contours through the back and will stop the winging of scapular (Chicken wings). Strong shoulders look great!!

So ..if you are aiming for Strong and Sexy remember to train for stability too. Power in useless without control!!

Post by Catherine Stephens B. App Sc (Physio) MAPA.

Physiotherapy, Shoulder

Frozen Shoulder – a predictable mystery

Although the reasons for onset of Frozen Shoulder remain unclear to the medical profession, the physiological process and symptoms experienced are quite predictable.

Most patients present with a general stiffness, restricted movement and some associated pain in the shoulder that radiates down the upper arm.  In some cases the pain is slight and in others extreme.

Ultrasounds and MRIs can detect many subtle abnormalities of joints and surrounding muscle and tissue but Frozen Shoulder is largely diagnosed by the physician based on movement dysfunction and associated pain, especially when elongated timeframes are involved e.g. 6 months plus.

Frozen shoulder age chart

It might sound a bit hit and miss but Frozen Shoulder is quite common – in fact 2% of the population suffer it with the vast majority of patients in their 50s.  If you have diabetic issues then the chances of it developing are even greater.

And ‘Developing’ is the only way to describe it.  Frozen Shoulder mainly occurs from no obvious associated injury to the shoulder.  In fact it can just develop for no apparent reason, though it will often accompany a recent traumatic incident – though again not necessarily to the shoulder.  A patient presented recently who had had a car accident, suffering whiplash and three weeks later developed a frozen shoulder.

The Process:

What happens is that the body ‘believes’ the main shoulder joint is damaged and therefore triggers an inflammatory response in order to heal it.  This involves streams of white blood cells, platelets and fibroplasts being sent to the joint lining and surrounding joint capsule and ligaments which causes inflammation and subsequent shrinkage which in turn restricts movement.

Frozen Shoulder Capsule

Left: Normal capsule allows generous movement Right: Frozen capsule shrinkage restricts movement

This process is like a ‘domino effect’, once started it naturally continues with no known way of stopping it – even though there is no original injury that triggered it.

Domino effect

It is as if the immune system makes an error of judgement.  In fact it is a natural hormonal change that instigates this ‘Inflammatory Cascade’ in the first place, which is why it affects women in their early 50s and men in their late 50s who are experiencing natural hormonal life changes at this time.

Eventually, after many months (usually around 5-7 months) the ‘dominoes’ run out and the inflammatory cascade stops, at which point Myofibroplasts are then sent in to smooth out the scar tissue.  This is exactly what happens with external injuries where the initial ugly scar tissue will soften and decrease until it eventually all but disappears.

Frozen shoulder timeframe

Pain starts to decrease and mobility return, but this is often a very slow process taking up to two years (and sometimes more) to complete and cannot be hurried along.

Treatment:

The most common treatment that can be effective during this ‘post freeze’ time is a cortisone injection into the glenohumeral (shoulder) joint which reduces the inflammation making it less painful and debilitating to everyday activities for around 3-4 weeks.  The injection can be repeated if needed.

Cortisone effect chart

It is a popular treatment that has much success but doesn’t always have optimum effect and in some cases can be relatively ineffective.

There are other methods for severe cases including arthroscopic capsular release, which is a key-hole, day-surgery procedure.

Physiotherapy:

Shoulder treatmentPhysiotherapy may exacerbate the pain in the first few months following the onset of symptoms in the ‘freezing’ phase or the inflammatory phase. But in the ‘thawing’ phase when the inflammation has settled, then physiotherapy and stretch exercises will help accelerate recovery in range of motion.

Due to the restrictions on movement inflicted by the Frozen Shoulder, all the other muscles surrounding the shoulder area will weaken and ligaments shrink, so a gradual stretching and re-building of muscle tone will be required over at least 6 months, sometimes longer.

Your physiotherapist is best to advise on exercise and stretching regimes, while taking care not to impinge the recovering joint.

Arms Spread

Author: This is a shortened version of an in-depth article by Mark Haber, specialist orthopaedic surgeon, M.B. B.S.  F.R.A.C.S. (Ortho). All illustrations copyright Mark Haber.   See full length article here.

Mark Haber conducts consultations at Warringah Medical Centre, Dale Street, Brookvale on referral from your GP.

Feet, Lifestyle, Physiotherapy

High Heels – The Pain for the Gain

High-heeled modelLove them or loathe them high heels have a marked effect on how a woman stands and moves and most men will know that these effects can often be quite alluring.

High heels:-

  • Increase the curvature of the calf improving muscle definition and in doing so enhance the slimness of the ankle
  • By lifting the heel the buttock muscles have to work harder and in doing so appear more pert.
  • The shift in weight means the chest is pushed forwards thereby enhancing breast lines.
  • The general awkwardness of the revised gait means that swings, sways and jiggles are introduced that tend to attract extra attention.

Xray of High HeelsHOWEVER!!  . . .

as can be seen in the X-ray of a foot in high heels, there are other factors to consider that not only cause pain during and after wearing, but can also cause long term damage.

  • Metatarsel pressureThe pressure on the Metatarsals  (the long bones just behind the toes or balls of the feet) is increased enormously. This increased pressure increases the risk of the development of a ‘Morton’s Neuroma’, (nerve aggravation between the metatarsals) which develops into a nerve growth.
  • Toe Squash in high heelsIf you compare the ultimate healthy state of barefeet it is easy to see how the toes are  pushed together to fit into the ‘glamorous’ narrow shoe, increasing the likelihood of Bunion formation ( Hallus valgus) and an overall cramping and deformation of the foot results.
  • Achilles tendonThe Achilles Tendon is shortened and prolonged wearing will cause permanent change which in turn changes the foot ankle dynamics and increase risk of ankle sprain and tendon damage.
  • The increased arch often affects the lower spine, increasing joint pressure that can cause episodes of back pain and instability.

So…. a physio’s advice (who has been known to wear high heels herself from time to time)  is to keep the really high heels for very special occasions!   Choose lower heels when you can. Keep this in mind when shopping girls!!

After a night in heels spend a few days in flats – or even barefeet if you can.

If heels are part  of the work attire, wear flats to and from work and slip on the glam’ professional look only when necessary.

Girls… remember it was a man who designed high heels and back in the times when men did wear heels they were not 15cm high and definitely not stilettos but wedges which are a more stable option!!!

Post by Catherine Stephens B. App Sc (Physio) MAPA.

Gardening, Lifestyle, Physiotherapy, Stretching

Keeping the ‘Ache’ out of Gardening

GardeningGardening can be the most restorative of activities – unless we overdo it, and most people will be guilty of that at some time or other.

The key is to not go at it like a bull at a gate, but to pace yourself (regardless of your age) and pause during repetitive tasks to let joints and muscles rest. Every fifteen minutes is a good target but don’t leave it more than half an hour before RESTING and performing the OPPOSITE movement for a short while.

Hands & Wrists:

Extended pruning with secateurs is a classic cause of RSI (repetitive strain injury).

Secateur-Hand-StretchJust pause now and then to stretch your fingers, hands and wrists in the opposite direction to the pruning action.  Joints will recover, muscles will shed their fatigue and you’ll be more efficient.

Shoulders:

While pruning or clipping overhead your shoulders will take most of the strain.  Just pause for a few moments and roll your shoulders down and back in a circular motion for one minute. Apart from providing rest for the muscles, you’ll also relieve those joints and tendons temporarily.  Remain standing tall during the exercise and keep your chin in.

Clipping-Shoulder-Roll

Back:

While digging, raking or bending to weed, stop and arch your spine and shoulders backwards with hands pushing your pelvis forwards.  It’s a classic for very good reason as it allows the gelatinous content of squashed discs to revert to balance again.

I see so many patients suffering from lower back pain from gardening, yet this small exercise can prevent so much discomfort.

Digging-Back-Arch

Knees:
Many gardening tasks involve kneeling and even if you’re wearing kneepads to protect the front of your knees, the knee joint and surrounding tendons needs rest and opposite action too.  So stand up and give them a rub and a wiggle (that’s a technical term for repetitive re-traction by the way).

Weeding-Knees-stretch

Painful Joints:

Many mature gardeners will suffer some occasional joint pain, whether it be arthritic or rheumatic and many will avoid outdoor activities at these times.  But all joints benefit from movement as it stimulates joint lubrication which in turn provides the nutrition for the joint linings and cuffs.

People who immobilise tetchy joints do themselves no favours as the joint will become stiff and produce even more pain. If you have painful joints and decide to do some gardening then warming up first is all the more important as this will minimise the initial discomfort.

But, as with all things to do with health, all movements should be performed in moderation. Stop if sharp pain persists and consult a doctor.

Post by Catherine Stephens B. App Sc (Physio) MAPA.  This article appeared originally on www.gardensonline.com.au

Feet, Physiotherapy, Stability

The foot – an amazing piece of machinery !

Happy feetWe stand, run, jump, hop & dance, all on our feet and rarely give them any thought until we feel pain or feel unsteady!

Our feet are the basis of our posture and give us most of the feedback we need to balance!

Bones of the footSo as upright animals we rely totally upon our feet, yet there they are, down there, out of sight, out of mind while many, many small muscles do their stabilising jobs.

But have you ever thought what’s involved in simply standing on your feet?

Here’s a simple exercise to highlight just one of the stabilising muscles.  Give this a try.

Stand with feet hip width apart.

Two feetTry to stretch you toes out straight and lean slightly forward so the tips of your toes have a small amount of weight on them but you haven’t lifted the heel.

Can you feel the muscles in the sole working? These are the muscles designed to support our arches and I bet this is the first time you’ve been aware of them !

But then our world is mostly flat and safe and we have no need to be in a position of preparation for change and as a result our feet get really lazy.

I like to think of our feet having a TRIPOD OF STABILITY.

  • The tip of the big toe
  • The base of the little toe and
  • The heel

Try standing with weight evenly distributed between these three points and you will unwittingly turn on a whole range of muscles in your foot, thigh, buttock and back.

Bare feet in grassStrong feet – the basis of good posture – a basis of good health.

Post by Catherine Stephens B. App Sc (Physio) MAPA.