Ankles, Feet, Physiotherapy, Sports

Ankle Sprains – Putting your Best Foot Forward

 

Musts following any ankle sprain.

Ankle sprains are very common among young and old  alike.  There are many different types and vary depending on the type and severity of the mechanism of injury. Most commonly ankleswollen-ankle sprains occur when we roll our foot inwards, stressing the ligaments that attach from the bone in our leg to the bone in our foot.  They are usually characterised by immediate swelling, pain and reduced range of movement.

After an ankle sprain, it is important to begin on the road to recovery as soon as possible and you can get started by using these simple tips.

RICER Tryptich

Rest – give the structures in your ankle time to heal and minimise the amount that you aggravate the injury.

Ice – place ice, a cold pack or frozen peas over the injured area for 20minutes every 2 hours for the first 72 hours to minimise swelling and reduce pain.

Compression – make use of an elastic bandage or compression sock to apply light compression to the area to reduce swelling.

Elevation – try to keep your ankle elevated with a foot stool when sitting and propping on pillows when lying down or sleeping.

Range of Motion – move your foot and ankle through light and pain-free movements to keep the blood flowing and prevent stiffening of the joint.

Support – if a crutch or stick is required because you cannot weight bear, use it correctly as shown in the video clip below and try to continue your walking pattern as similar to pre-injury as possible.

Always hold the support on the opposite side to the injury, put injured leg forward first accompanied by the support – this will provide you with a wider and more stable base of support.

 


Referral – book in to see your physiotherapist ASAP for treatment, further advice and redirection of care as an X-ray, MRI or specialist appointment may be necessary.

These tips are just some of the steps required immediately after a sprain to allow a return to full functional capacity.  Physiotherapists have a much broader range of tools and strategies at their disposal and their consultation could prevent long-term issues and promote faster recovery.

Post by Mitchell Sandvoss (B. Physiotherapy)

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Achilles, Daily Exercises, Feet, Injuries, Lifestyle, Physiotherapy, Sports, Stretching

The “Achilles Heel” of runners!! 5 tips to help remedy Achilles tendon pain.

Whether you are a professional marathon runner or simply enjoy a recreational jog it is likely that you have experienced pain in the Achilles tendon at some point. The pain will generally be most prominent during warm-up, settle down significantly as you run only to return with a vengeance after you have cooled down after running! If it continues to worsen, it can become very debilitating and prevent from running altogether!

This article will help to arm you with the anatomical information and practical knowledge necessary to help recognise Achilles tendon pain and how to manage it!

Firstly, it is important that you know the anatomy of your Achilles!

Achilles tendonThe Achilles tendon joins the calf muscle to the heel bone. Tendons are a soft tissue structure made up of the elastic material called collagen and always attach muscles to bone. The role of the Achilles tendon is to transfer the power produced by your calf muscles through to the heel bone to move the ankle joint and provide you with forwards thrust as you run.

Pain in this area can be as a result of tendonitis (inflammation of the tendon) or tearing. It can sometimes start very suddenly after a big load through the tendon, such as falling into a pothole as you run. More commonly, pain in the Achilles develops a gradually over time as a result of overuse and worsens unless managed appropriately.

Things that can predispose you to Achilles tendon pain are:

  • Poor foot mechanics (corrective orthotics or well prescribed sports shoes can help enormously)
  • Stiffness of the ankle joints (this can occur after an acute ankle injury such as a rolled ankle)
  • A significant and sudden increase in training load (such as further distance, increased regularity, or extra hills etc.)
  • Weakness of the hip or core muscles

To remedy the situation there are 5 simple things that you can do:

  1. Stretching may aggravate the tendon! Avoid dropping your heel off a step or doing strong calf stretching as this is too aggressive for a sore or damaged tendongastrocnemius-stretch-stairs
  2. Mobilising the sciatic nerve system before rising from bed can help with morning stiffnessHamstringAnim2
  3. Avoid high impact exercises like jumping, skipping, running (especially soft sand running!)Skipping
  4. A small heel raise can help alleviate pain and overstretching in the short term (put one in both shoes!)heel lift illustrated  copy
  5. Get some professional advice from a physiotherapist. There are a number of important exercises that can be done to improve your tendon pain and get you back to running ASAP!!

 

Post by Angus Tadman (B.App.Sc Phty Hons I) and Catherine Stephens (B.App.Sc Phty)

abdominals, Balance, Core stability, Daily Exercises, Hips, Injuries, Lifestyle, Physio's Personal Tips, Physiotherapy, Skiing, Sports, Stability

Skiing injury prevention program!

If you are a budding skier then you have probably experienced the frustration of getting injured early in a skiing holiday and missing out on enjoying the rest of your time at the snow. After all that expense, the last thing you need is to be injured!!

The following series of informational videos provides a step by step exercise program designed to improve your skiing specific strength, power and stability. Most importantly, the following exercises will not only help to prevent injury, but will maximise your performance on skis!

Please enjoy the following exercises and always practice caution when learning something new! We’d love to hear how you managed with the program so please, comment below!

 

 

 

 

 

Post by Catherine Stephens (B.App.Sc – Physiotherapy)

Improving Movement, Physiotherapy, Sports, Stretching

Best hamstring stretching technique

If you spend a lot of time at a desk or do a lot of physical activity such as running and cycling then it is likely that you will have tightness in your hamstrings. Tightness in the hamstring muscle group can lead to knee pain, back pain and can increase the risk of tearing the hamstrings during activity.

To effectively isolate and stretch the hamstring muscle group it is crucial that your technique is right. There are a number of different “hamstring stretches” out there but the following video outlines the best way to get a strong isolated stretch into the hamstrings!

Let us know your reactions to our blogs – we’d love to hear from you, critiques, queries, compliments all gratefully accepted.

Post by Angus Tadman B. App. Sc (Phty) Hons Class I