Lifestyle, Physio's Personal Tips, Physiotherapy, Stability, Work

Avoiding a Pain in the Neck

The link between neck pain and technology use.

laptop-postureNeck pain is becoming more prevalent in recent times and much of it is linked to the poor postures we adopt when using technology.

On average, we spend 15 hours a week in front of a screen (almost 1 month of the year), and up to 50 hours a week if it is required for work. When using technology, our eyes need to be in an optimal position to focus on the screen. For most of us, it is easiest to poke our chin out to get closer to the screen.

For each inch that your head sits forward of its normal position, the head adds 4.5kg of force onto the small and fragile structures within your neck.  All of this added pressure can cause neck pain, shoulder pain, arm pain and headaches from the muscles in your neck having to work harder and the added pressure placed on the discs, nerves and vertebrae.

ForwardHdEv

If you are someone who spends a lot of your hours in front of the screen, behind the wheel or on the couch, there are some strategies that you can adopt to ease the pressure on your poor neck!

Activation of your Deep Neck Flexors

Your deep neck flexors are muscles in front of the spine responsible for neck stability (similar to the role of the deep abdominals in your lumbar spine) and supporting the head directly over the spine.  When your neck is over your spine, the pressure on other parts of your neck and body will be reduced.

Activating them can be difficult if you are doing so for the first time, so follow these simple steps:

Step 1 – Lie down on your back with a pillow underneath your head and neck, legs bent up and muscles relaxed.

Feeling Neck FlexorsStep 2 – Tuck your chin in so it feels as though it is lightly blocking your windpipe and push the back of your skull into the pillow.  Do NOT activate the muscles at the front of your neck.  Place your fingers on these muscles if necessary to stop them from activating.

Step 3 – Hold this position for 5 seconds before relaxing.  Repeat 10 times before having a rest, then complete 1-4 more sets of 10 until fatigued.

Chin Retraction

Chin Retraction – make a double chin, hold for 5 secs, then relax

Constant awareness of your neck position

When in the car, use the head rest and tuck your chin in.  When at your desk or when using technology, make sure you are not protruding your chin to see the screen.  And, when you are sitting on the couch make sure your head is in a good position and is supported appropriately.

Set up your environment correctly

Move the items in your environment (screen, mouse, keyboard, chair) so that you can maintain a good posture and still work efficiently.   Laptops and tablets force poor posture as looking down at the screen and typing so close prevents good posture. Purchasing a wireless keyboard to use with your tablet to separate hands and screen, increase the font size on your smartphone, correct the angle of your screen on your laptop and position pillows properly when sitting on the couch to provide low back support..

Ergonomics1

Take regular breaks

Increasing the amount of time that the structures in your neck are under pressure will increase the likelihood of developing pain.  Scheduling regular breaks will allow your neck to have a rest and to relieve the strain.

____________________________________________________________________________

If you do suffer from neck pain due to poor posture, these strategies will help you.  Poor posture, however, is not the only cause of neck pain and if pain persists we do recommend consulting your physiotherapist for a full assessment.

Post by Mitchell Sandvoss (B. Physiotherapy)

Advertisements
Balance, Daily Exercises, Lifestyle, Physiotherapy, Stability

Heart – the Most Important Muscle of All

People tend to think of physiotherapy as only being concerned with the obvious muscles like “glutes”, “pecs”, “biceps”, “quads” etc.  And although having strength and power in these muscles is important, there is one muscle that overrides all in it’s importance to maintaining good health.

SkippingI’m referring of course to the heart muscle! Without a healthy heart then all the good work done in keeping your other muscles strong is wasted!

Here at Northern Beaches Physiotherapy we are dedicated to helping our patients maintain good overall health. One major aspect of this is achieving good cardiac fitness and endurance!

There are myriad ways to exercise the heart but one of the easiest and most convenient (and therefore most likely to be done on a regular basis) is skipping.  The equipment costs are probably less than $5 and you need a space only as big as a small room or courtyard to do it in!

Skipping for five-ten minutes every day is about as good an exercise as you’ll get. Its not just aerobic – it will also keep many other muscles in tone, including your calves, thighs and buttocks.

Skipping also provides a challenge to the stabilising muscles of your ankles and core, as well as challenging the coordination of your shoulders, wrists and legs!

So go buy yourself a skipping rope and challenge yourself!! Skip for five-ten minutes everyday and in next to no time you will see the benefits to your overall fitness and health!

 

Post by Angus Tadman (B.App.Sc Phty Hons I)

abdominals, back, Core stability, Daily Exercises, Gymn Dangers, Hips, Improving Movement, Injuries, Physio's Personal Tips, Physiotherapy, Pilates, Stability

How stable is your core?? Here’s how to check!

personaltrainerOften, people spend hours doing “core training” in the gym such as sit-ups, planks and the like only to find that they still experience symptoms of instability such as low back pain during training or, they get injured regularly doing exercise. The problem? This kind of “core training” addresses the strength of your abdominal and oblique muscles which are responsible for providing movement but does not train the deeper, stabilising muscles that are responsible for maintaining good alignment of the spine.

Here is a little exercise to introduce the feeling and the essence of stability in you torso. The true “core”:

1. Lie on your back, knees up, feet flat on the ground.

2. Breath, and feel how your ribs move and the shape of your spine changes.

3. Place your index fingers on the bones at the top of your pelvis at the front.

4. Feel what happens when you lift one foot from the floor REALLY SLOWLY!!! No jumping it up!!!

5. Try again and try to not allow any movement in your pelvis or lumbar spine.

Did you hold your breath? Did your pelvis roll toward the side you lifted? Did your back arch away from the floor? Did you get a “ping” of back  pain?

If YES was an answer to any of these questions you have room for improvement in you core stabilisation.

Practicing this exercise is actually a great way to begin the reactivation of your deeper, stabilising muscles.  Breathing as you move and load the spine is essential to prevent rigidity. Our bodies are designed to be fluid and coordinated when moving and breath holding can stifle this and cause us to become to stiff when moving! If you don’t breath while you do anything you won’t do it for very long!!

Mullumbimby-Pilates

For detailed explanation of core stability refer to our previous blog “What is core stability?”. You can find it here: https://northernbeachesphysio.com/2014/03/28/what-is-core-stability/.

Also, watch this video of one of physiotherapists, Angus, walking through the above exercise and explaining how to activate your core!

abdominals, Balance, Core stability, Daily Exercises, Hips, Injuries, Lifestyle, Physio's Personal Tips, Physiotherapy, Skiing, Sports, Stability

Skiing injury prevention program!

If you are a budding skier then you have probably experienced the frustration of getting injured early in a skiing holiday and missing out on enjoying the rest of your time at the snow. After all that expense, the last thing you need is to be injured!!

The following series of informational videos provides a step by step exercise program designed to improve your skiing specific strength, power and stability. Most importantly, the following exercises will not only help to prevent injury, but will maximise your performance on skis!

Please enjoy the following exercises and always practice caution when learning something new! We’d love to hear how you managed with the program so please, comment below!

 

 

 

 

 

Post by Catherine Stephens (B.App.Sc – Physiotherapy)

abdominals, Balance, Core stability, Daily Exercises, Physiotherapy, Shoulder, Stability

Swiss Ball for Stability – video-blog

Hello and welcome to our first video blog.

Its all about core stability, pelvic stability and balance – all three very important to maintaining a healthy balance within yourself.

Here’s Angus to demonstrate the exercise.

If you haven’t got a Swiss Ball at home then we highly recommend you get one – they are an extremely versatile aid to keeping yourself in-trim at home and to top it all they are great fun to use too.   We’ll have plenty more demonstrations of exercises you can do with a Swiss Ball soon.

We have them in stock in the shop so ask at reception. Here’s the page that lists all our supplies:- https://northernbeachesphysio.com/supplies/

We’re aiming to make a lot more video clips over the course of this year which will be hosted on our Northern Beaches Physio channel on YouTube.

Here’s a link:-  http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNCRpch8eeN3bPCH4oaAPFQ

Stay tuned !

So, how are we doing?  Did Angus do well? (and no, channel seven, you can’t have him).  Do you like our blogs?  What would you like to see more of?  Use the ‘Reply’ field below to have your say, we’d love to hear from you.

Post by Catherine Stephens B. App Sc (Physio) MAPA.

Gluteal, Hips, Improving Movement, Physiotherapy, Stability

Happy Hips

Whether you are a walker, a runner, footballer or even a belly-dancer, everyone needs good hip stability to be able to perform their sport (or their art) with optimum control.

Belly Dancers Hips

Poor stability around the hip joint can lead to problems such as trochanteric bursitis, lower back pain, sciatic pain and groin injuries. If you have one of these problems it is possible that you have weakness and poor control of the deep muscles of your hip joint.

Hip stability is achieved by having not only strength of the big gluteal muscles that make up the bulk of your buttocks but also good timing of activation and control of the deeper muscles of the hip joint. These deep muscles are responsible for stabilising the hip joint during movement to allow the larger gluteal muscles to move your hip with better joint alignment.

Hips Start

Knees bent, pelvis tilted

To test your deep hip stability simply follow these steps:

1) Stand in front of a mirror with your knees slightly bent (around 30 degrees) and your pelvis tilted forwards.

Now place your hands on your hips to feel the muscles just behind your hip with your thumbs and your abdomen with fingertips.

Hip exercise

Hips always level

2) Gently transfer your weight to one side, aiming to keep your knee, hip and shoulder aligned on the side that you are leaning toward e.g. your hips stay level with the ground.

Hold for a few seconds then transfer your weight to the other foot, again keeping your hips level.

If you have good stability you should be able to do this and maintain alignment of your hips, knees and shoulders, as shown in the animated image on the left, and you will feel the muscles activate strongly.

If you have poor stability you will find it hard to keep your balance and you may see your hips drop or your shoulders sway too far out to the side, as shown below.

Happy Hips Wrong

Left – hips crooked, Centre starting position. Right – hips crooked

Practicing this simple movement daily can help to improve the stability of your hip joint.

Keep it up! Remember; stable hips are happy hips!

Post by Angus Tadman B. App. Sc (Phty) Hons Class I

abdominals, Gymn Dangers, Physiotherapy, Pilates, Shoulder, Stability

Strong is the new SEXY

Strong is the new sexy but you have to be stable to be strong

Fit Woman

The media image of gorgeous and sexy has changed in recent years. It seems the willowy overly thin or the voluptuous curvy image of attractive woman has been surpassed with healthy strong and muscular women like Michelle Bridges or Anglina Jolie as Lara Croft. Men with muscles and great posture have always been the most admired and now the girls are aiming for the same.

In endeavouring to achieve this end it is essential to increase core strength and stability as we build power. A failure to address the “stability” part of “strong” will leave the body at risk of injury. Building muscle bulk is quite possible without core strength but pain might build to and there is nothing sexy about being injured or in pain!

We see increasing episodes at the clinic of back pain, tendon injuries and knee injuries in the strong but unstable individual who has been focusing purely on developing power and a good looking pysique.

Cross TrainerSome gym machines provide so much control of movement there is no challenge to stability, resulting in increasing strength but without the protection offered by the co-activation of stabilising muscle systems throughout the body.

Holding onto the handles of the cross trainer has the machine providing control of movement direction, minimising how much stability you have to provide from within.   Using the cross trainer not holding the handles ensures YOU have to provide the stability and control to maintain smooth movement.

Try it and feel the difference…. carefully at first!!  It is a much harder workout – and thats the acid test.  If its easy its not doing you as much good.

BOSU

Incorporating free weights and weight bearing exercise on unstable platforms like a BOSU will have you protecting the joints while building strength.

We know that good control and correct activation of the deeper abdominals flatten the tummy. Without this the rectus abdominus  (the six pack muscle) can strengthen but the abdomen can remain distended.  We often see very strong men with big bellys… a result of poor training technique.

Strengthening the deeper muscles around the shoulder girdle gives improved contours through the back and will stop the winging of scapular (Chicken wings). Strong shoulders look great!!

So ..if you are aiming for Strong and Sexy remember to train for stability too. Power in useless without control!!

Post by Catherine Stephens B. App Sc (Physio) MAPA.

Feet, Physiotherapy, Stability

The foot – an amazing piece of machinery !

Happy feetWe stand, run, jump, hop & dance, all on our feet and rarely give them any thought until we feel pain or feel unsteady!

Our feet are the basis of our posture and give us most of the feedback we need to balance!

Bones of the footSo as upright animals we rely totally upon our feet, yet there they are, down there, out of sight, out of mind while many, many small muscles do their stabilising jobs.

But have you ever thought what’s involved in simply standing on your feet?

Here’s a simple exercise to highlight just one of the stabilising muscles.  Give this a try.

Stand with feet hip width apart.

Two feetTry to stretch you toes out straight and lean slightly forward so the tips of your toes have a small amount of weight on them but you haven’t lifted the heel.

Can you feel the muscles in the sole working? These are the muscles designed to support our arches and I bet this is the first time you’ve been aware of them !

But then our world is mostly flat and safe and we have no need to be in a position of preparation for change and as a result our feet get really lazy.

I like to think of our feet having a TRIPOD OF STABILITY.

  • The tip of the big toe
  • The base of the little toe and
  • The heel

Try standing with weight evenly distributed between these three points and you will unwittingly turn on a whole range of muscles in your foot, thigh, buttock and back.

Bare feet in grassStrong feet – the basis of good posture – a basis of good health.

Post by Catherine Stephens B. App Sc (Physio) MAPA.

Improving Movement, Physiotherapy, Stability

5 exercises to keep your shoulder stable and healthy

The key to a healthy, pain free and strong shoulder is a stable scapula (or shoulder blade) which is the base from which all shoulder movement occurs. It is the bone where the “socket” of your shoulder is found and to which the “ball” of your upper arm (humerus) connects.

Losing scapula stability is often the first step toward developing painful injuries such as rotator cuff tears, subacromial bursitis and arthritis.

The following exercises are very effective for improving scapula stability and therefore improving shoulder function. Please keep in mind that you should never have pain during or after doing these exercises. If you do, please consult a physiotherapist before continuing.

scapulaScapula Clock#1.Scapula clock: Stand close to a wall with your elbow bent. Place your hand on a small ball on the wall just below shoulder height. Roll your shoulder blade back and down and hold it set in this position.

Make circles alternating from clockwise to counterclockwise with your hand on the ball while maintaining your shoulder set. Repeat 10 times each way.

Pull Downs#2. Pull downs: Using a cable or theratube secured above you.

Pull down with straight arms to the side of body and simultaneously draw your shoulder blades back and down to feel muscular squeeze in the middle part of your back just below the shoulder blades.

Repeat 10-20 times.

Wall Push Ups#3. Wall push ups: Place hands on wall below shoulder height and slightly wider than shoulder width.

Stand with feet together and away from wall so you are weight bearing through your arms and hands.

Do slow push ups on the wall being mindful to keep the shoulders back and down as you press toward wall.

As you press away from the wall roll the shoulder blades around the ribcage to arch the upper spine.  Repeat 10 times.

4 Point Kneeling#4. Four point kneeling: Assume four point kneeling position.

Take weight forward so your nose is in front of your fingertips. Bend elbows and take shoulders down away from your ears.

Keep shoulders back and down and maintain stability on one arm as you lift the other out in front.  Repeat on the other side and do 5-10 repetitions.

Ball Roll#5. Roll out on ball: Assume start position as pictured.

Ensure shoulders, hips and knees are aligned and support weight on hands.

Slowly roll the ball out in front of you, keeping your body aligned and extend the arms away from the body to allow the elbows and forearms to rest on the ball.

Maintain shoulder blades down and back. Repeat 10 times.

Post by Angus Tadman